Communicating global change

Poster design by Matt Abele

Poster design by Matt Abele

For my graduate Communication Campaigns course at NC State this past spring, a group of us developed a communication campaign proposal for the Southeast Climate Science Center‘s (SE CSC) inaugural Global Change Symposium. Recently, we checked in to find that the good folks at SE CSC were able to implement many of our tactics.

This Global Change Symposium, which will be held on August 28, is a first-time “meeting of the minds” of researchers, faculty, students, administrators at NC State. The SE CSC envisions this event as an opportunity to unite the various efforts across the campus to address global change.

What is global change, you say? Good question! It is a broad term meant to capture many of the complex changes occurring with regard to earth’s environmental, population, and food systems. Effectively conveying the importance and relevance of this broad concept was one of the fundamental challenges of the campaign.

 

From our proposal

The problem: Engage and persuade a diverse audience of stakeholders to attend the inaugural Global Change Symposium. Audiences included professors/researchers, administrators, and graduate students. SE CSC sought to engage an interdisciplinary group of researchers to unite the varying efforts of researchers across campus.

The solution: Create targeted messages for subgroups by type of audience and academic discipline using strategic channels to both inspire interest and justify benefits of attending the symposium.

As a team, we reviewed literature about communication campaigns, determined campaign goals, conducted focus group with stakeholders, developed messaging and communication assets, pretested messages with stakeholders, and created an evaluation plan. All of this culminated in a 80+ page campaign proposal which we presented to SE CSC in April.

Our team was delighted to find the SE CSC has utilized much of our campaign strategy and used materials we designed in their communication for the symposium on their website and emails, among others channels.

If you will be around Raleigh in August (sadly, I will not be!) I recommend you attend this exciting event to learn the latest about how NC State is addressing global change issues — and potentially get involved.

The Spring 2015 COM 529 Communication Campaigns course was taught by NC State Associate Professor of Communication Dr. James Kiwanuka-Tondo. Our team was made up of the following members: Matt Abele, Ben Lawson, Kelly Long, Tara Watterson, Alexa Wood.

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