Innovative research partnership: Chris and Lynsey explore recovery communication strategies

Innovative research partnerships is a series of profiles about collaborations between Ph.D. communication researchers and working professionals in the community. I consider these partnerships innovative because of the creativity involved in initiating and sustaining cross-sector collaborative research. Through separate interviews of both partners in the collaboration, I share the unique stories behind the partnerships, the challenges they face in their collaborative efforts, and the fruits of these partnerships. The series is posted in anticipation of my two upcoming conference sessions about research partnerships at ComNet17 in September and NCA in November. I hope to see you at one of these sessions and please be in touch if you have ideas about research partners to interview!

Today, I highlight the partnership between Lynsey Romo and Chris Campau, who have worked together on research for a year and a half. Their research explores how students in recovery from drug and alcohol abuse talk to others about their recovery status (or not) given the stigma and negative reactions the students may face. First, we hear from Chris.

Chris Campau is the collegiate recovery program coordinator at Addiction Professionals of North Carolina.

On what he has gained from the partnership: Chris said that he learned from this research that some students in recovery simply “wouldn’t talk about it at all on campus.” This has informed his work in his current position coordinating support for students in recovery. Further, he noticed the empowerment and positivity he saw in students who possessed more communication strategies to manage disclosure of their recovery status. He said this has refreshed his commitment to conducting more recovery message training programs for people in recovery.

On his role in the partnership: Chris started working with Lynsey while he was a non-traditional student at NC State University. As a person in recovery himself, Chris was paid to conduct interviews asking participants who were in recovery about their experiences disclosing their recovery status or not. He asked about how they disclose their status and how disclosures changed based on whether participants were talking with drinking peers, non-drinking peers, or with professors. Chris has also been involved with analyzing data and writing up the research report.

On challenges the partnership faced: When he began his new job, Chris said the project had to be put on hold for several months and lost some steam. He said he felt he has been able to readjust and rejoin work on the research now that he has settled into his new job.

On why the partnership works: Chris said that Lynsey is “an extraordinary human being.” He said that what made the partnership successful is that both parties were equally willing to learn about the other’s work and expertise.

Dr. Lynsey Romo is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at North Carolina State University.

On how the partnership got started: According to Lynsey, the partnership began when an addiction treatment professional in Raleigh who had read a previous research article of hers about communication among nondrinkers set up a meeting to introduce Chris and Lynsey.

On why this research matters: This research expands on some of Lynsey’s previous research about the difficulty faced by former problem drinkers in social situations. Studying the social experiences of people in recovery and gathering communication strategies they use can help in developing support for this population in managing their new-found sobriety and identity.

On challenges the partnership faced: Lynsey said that, generally, doing applied research with community partners can sometimes take longer since you “lose some control of the process.” This can be a challenge since she is under pressure as a faculty member seeking tenure to publish her research in a timely manner. However, she said this project has been a win-win that is valuable to the community and to the academic research community.

On why this partnership works: Lynsey said that having funds to pay Chris for some of his early work interviewing participants while he was still a non-traditional student helped get the project off to a strong start. Lynsey said she and Chris have a great rapport. She added that he brings a lot to the table because “he is so passionate and has first-hand knowledge” about the research topic.

Disclosure: I have previously worked with Lynsey on research an am a co-author on the paper cited in the interview. Further, I have previously met Chris and his colleagues through research with Lynsey. I was not, however, involved in the research project discussed in this profile.

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